Mary Shelley, Romanticism, and Frankenstein
 
Mont Blanc and the surrounding area, one of the main settings for the novel. http://www.cherrychapman.com/2013/03/12/thrill-seekers-and-death-on-mont-blanc/

 
An Introduction to the Essentials for the Novel

 

Let me preface by saying I cherish this story. Frankenstein is by far my favorite classic novel, and one that I look forward to chewing apart and discussing with the class. But let me admit: I wasn't thrilled when I first read the story of Victor Frankenstein and his creation. My expectations led me to believe that this novel was going to be about the terrible acts of a monster, one that was so horrifying it would keep me up at night. In truth, my expectations were not incorrect, but rather misplaced. The story of the monster and his creator may not be quite what you expect.

The reason I love Frankenstein is because of the questions that are asked in the novel, and that these questions are still relevant today. I know that sounds like a very generic, teacher-like thing to say, but hear me out: nearly every novel, movie, or television show of today draws on the same questions that Mary Shelley approaches in her novel. Every time I read Frankenstein I find something new to explore, and itís because Mary Shelley wrote a story that is dynamic, accessible, and timeless.

Let me give you an example of what Iím getting at. Jurassic Park is one of my favorite movies, and if youíve seen it, I know itís one of your favorites too. Who doesnít like that movie? If you have not seen Jurrasic Park all you need to understand about the movie, right now, is that a few men discovered how to extract and clone DNA from dinosaurs, and they cloned an island full of various species of dinosaur. Trouble then ensues for the characters of the movie. What I want you to do is watch a clip from the movie, using the video below. I apologize if there is an advertisement to sit through. Also, be courteous to those around you, and keep your volume low. It may also help to turn on the subtitles and pause the clip to take notes. Listen carefully to what Ian (Jeff Goldblumís character) is saying.

Once youíre finished, spend a few minutes reflecting on the clip you just watched. What happened? How do you feel about what Ian is saying in the clip? Do you agree or disagree? What are Ianís main concerns here? Answer using the handout. When you are finished, click below to go to the next page.




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